The Angels, Their Hierarchy and Order (continued)

October 13, 2018
By fsspx.news
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The writings of St. Thomas Aquinas offer accurate and clear teachings on the holy angels who are our guardians.

In this month of October dedicated to the holy guardian angels, FSSPX.News proposes to its readers the treatise on the angels developed in the Catechism of the Summa Theologica by Fr. Thomas Pègues, OP. Published in 1918, this work explains the teachings of the Angelic Doctor on a level that anyone can grasp.

How does the first hierarchy know the reasons of the things related to the divine government?
The first hierarchy knows these reasons as they proceed from the universal First Principle, God (q. 108, a. 1). 

And what does this mean for the angels of this first hierarchy?
This means that the angels of the first hierarchy are said to be close to God, and the names of all the orders of this hierarchy come from some office whose direct object is God Himself (q. 108, a. 1 and 6).

How does the second hierarchy know the reasons of the things related to the divine government?
The second hierarchy knows these reasons as they depend on universal created causes (q. 108, a. 1).

What does this mean for the angels of this second hierarchy?
This means that the angels of this second hierarchy receive their illumination from the first hierarchy and that the names of their orders come from some office having to do with the universality of the creatures governed by God (q. 108, a. 1 and 6). 

How does the third hierarchy know the reasons of the things related to the divine government?
The third hierarchy knows these reasons as they apply to particular things and as they depend on their proper causes (q. 108, a. 1). 

What does this mean for the angels of this third hierarchy?
This means that the angels of this third hierarchy receive the divine light according to particular forms that allow them to communicate with our intelligences on earth, and that the names of their orders come from acts limited to man, for example, the guardian angels, or to a province, for example, the principalities (q. 108, &. 1 and 6).